News & Updates

EBOLA UPDATE

The New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) Student Health Services (SHS) would like to share the following information with our international students or those studying abroad.  The World Health Organization  (WHO) has declared the Ebola outbreak to be an international emergency.  However, it has not classified it as a pandemic (epidemic of infectious disease). At this time, the New Jersey Department of Health, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have issued advisories which NJIT Student Health Services is closely monitoring.

 For students who are travelling from any of the countries in West Africa at high risk, we do advise that you review the information you received at the time of your arrival into the US at the airport.

• The CDC advises students and all travelers to follow the monitoring guidelines.  The guidelines are based on your level of risk. 

• If you have no risk you will not be asked to do any monitoring.

• If you are in the at risk categories you will be required to be monitored.( http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/advice-for-colleges-universities-and-students-about-ebola-in-west-africa)

o You may be sked to monitor yourself and /or check-in with the local Health Department.

o You are to contact the NJIT Student Health Services at 973-596-3621 upon arrival on the NJIT campus, so we can review the monitoring plan.

o If you are ask to either self-monitor or report to the local Health Department for 21 days, we will require that you adhere to the plan. 

Symptoms of Ebola typically include

• Fever (greater than 38.6°C or 101.5°F)

• Severe headache

• Muscle pain

• Weakness

• Diarrhea

• Vomiting

• Abdominal (stomach) pain

• Lack of appetite

Some patients may experience

• Rash

• Red eyes

• Hiccups

• Cough

• Sore throat

• Chest pain

• Difficulty breathing

• Difficulty swallowing

• Unexplained bleeding inside and outside of the body

If you experience any of those symptoms during the 21-day period after your arrival, contact the NJIT SHS by phone as soon as possible at 973-596-3621. If it is after hours and we are not available, call NJIT Public Safety at 973-596-3111. We advise that you not come directly to SHS or go to any other health care facility before calling us to receive advice on how to access urgent medical care.  This precaution is required because:

• If you are possibly contagious, you will not put others at risk while you are traveling to the medical care facility.

• If you need transport to the nearest medical facility by ambulance, you will be required to let health care providers know that you have travelled from an Ebola Virus Disease high-risk area.

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Report Immigration Scams

Have you been a victim of an immigration services scam, and need to find help? You can always report scams to the Federal Trade Commission. You may  also file a complaint in your state.  In the table below, we've included information on where to report scams in your state as well as links to the laws that protect you as a consumer.

Remember reporting scams will not affect your immigration application or petition. Also, many states allow you to report scams anonymously. Please help stop the unauthorized practice of immigration law by standing up to scammers and reporting them.

Copy this link into your browser and find where you live to make a report:

http://www.uscis.gov/avoid-scams/report-immigration-scams

 Last Reviewed/Updated: 07/11/2014

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How do I prepare to return to the United States after a vacation?

Copy and paste the link below:

http://studyinthestates.dhs.gov/2013/11/ask-a-dso-how-do-i-prepare-to-return-to-the-united-states-after-a-vacation

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 Current Travel Warnings

Travel Warnings are issued when long-term, protracted conditions that make a country dangerous or unstable lead the State Department to recommend that Americans avoid or consider the risk of travel to that country. A Travel Warning is also issued when the U.S. Government's ability to assist American citizens is constrained due to the closure of an embassy or consulate or because of a drawdown of its staff. The countries listed below meet those criteria.

Kenya    09/27/2013

Turkey    09/06/2013

Lebanon    09/06/2013

Pakistan    09/06/2013

Iraq    09/05/2013

Algeria    08/23/2013

Afghanistan    08/23/2013

Egypt    08/15/2013

Haiti    08/13/2013

El Salvador    08/09/2013

Yemen   08/06/2013

Saudi Arabia   07/25/2013

Mali    07/18/2013

Niger    07/15/2013

Mexico    07/12/2013

Philippines    07/05/2013

Somalia    06/21/2013

Israel, the West Bank and Gaza    06/19/2013

Honduras   06/17/2013

Chad    06/11/2013

Libya    06/07/2013

Nigeria    06/03/2013

Iran    05/24/2013

Mauritania    05/21/2013

Cote d'Ivoire   05/16/2013

Eritrea    05/10/2013

Central African Republic    05/10/2013

Congo, Democratic Republic of the    04/24/2013

Burundi    04/22/2013

Sudan    04/16/2013

Colombia    04/11/2013

Republic of South Sudan   03/29/2013

Korea, Democratic People's Republic of    03/14/2013

Tunisia    03/13/2013

Syria    03/01/2013

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ATTENTION....TELEPHONE SCAM

USCIS has recently reported a new telephone scam targeting USCIS applicants and petitions. The technique is called “Caller ID spoofing” which displays a misleading or inaccurate phone number in the recipient’s caller ID. The scammer poses as a USCIS official and requests personal information, for example a social security number, passport number, or alien registration number. The scammer then identifies supposed issues in the applicant’s immigration records and then requests payment in order to correct those records.

USCIS has advised that payment in never solicited telephonically, and advises that if an individual should receive such a call it should be reported to the Federal Trade Commission at https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/

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TRAVEL ALERT!!!

               Current Travel Warnings

Travel Warnings are issued when long-term, protracted conditions that make a country dangerous or unstable lead the State Department to recommend that Americans avoid or consider the risk of travel to that country. A Travel Warning is also issued when the U.S. Government's ability to assist American citizens is constrained due to the closure of an embassy or consulate or because of a drawdown of its staff. The countries listed below meet those criteria.

Saudi Arabia   07/25/2013

Mali    07/18/2013

Yemen   07/16/2013

Niger    07/15/2013

Mexico   07/12/2013

Philippines    07/05/2013

Kenya    07/05/2013

Egypt    07/03/2013

Somalia    06/21/2013

Israel, the West Bank and Gaza    06/19/2013

Honduras   06/17/2013

Chad    06/11/2013

Libya    06/07/2013

Nigeria    06/03/2013

Iran    05/24/2013

Mauritania    05/21/2013

Cote d'Ivoire   05/16/2013

Eritrea    05/10/2013

Central African Republic    05/10/2013

Congo, Democratic Republic of the    04/24/2013

Burundi    04/22/2013

Sudan    04/16/2013

Colombia    04/11/2013

Pakistan    04/09/2013

Lebanon    04/01/2013

Republic of South Sudan   03/29/2013

Korea, Democratic People's Republic of    03/14/2013

Guinea    03/14/2013

Tunisia    03/13/2013

Syria    03/01/2013

Iraq    02/25/2013

Algeria    02/19/2013

Afghanistan    01/29/2013

El Salvador    01/23/2013

Haiti    12/28/2012

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I-901 SEVIS Fee Payment (I-797C "Notice of Action")

SEVIS NOTICE – July 29, 2013

Effective July 31, 2013 the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) will no longer mail Form I-797C “Notice of Action” for the I-901 SEVIS fee payment.

The payment confirmation you can print from the FMJ fee website will replace the Form I-797C.  The printed confirmation will serve as proof of payment for the I-901 SEVIS fee.

Attached is the updated paper Form I-901 that no longer contains a field for expedited receipt delivery.  The paper Form I-901 will be available from the SEVP website.

If you have questions regarding any of the changes described in the attached notice, please contact the SEVP Response Center at 703-603-3400 or the I-901 Case Resolution Unit at fmjfee.sevis@ice.dhs.gov.

Thank you.

Student and Exchange Visitor Program

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Travel Warning: Egypt

Political Violence

Near East > Egypt > Cairo

7/3/2013

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens to defer travel to Egypt and U.S. citizens living in Egypt to depart at this time because of the continuing political and social unrest. This Travel Warning supersedes the Travel Warning issued on June 28, 2013.  

On July 3, 2013, the Department of State ordered the departure of non-emergency U.S. government personnel and family members from Egypt due to the ongoing political and social unrest.

Political unrest, which intensified prior to the constitutional referendum in December 2012 and the anniversary in 2013 of Egypt's 25th January Revolution, is likely to worsen in the near future due to unrest focused on the first anniversary of the President’s assumption of office. Demonstrations have, on occasion, degenerated into violent clashes between police and protesters, and between protesters supporting different factions, resulting in deaths, injuries, and extensive property damage. Participants have thrown rocks and Molotov cocktails and security forces have used tear gas and other crowd control measures against demonstrators. There are numerous reports of the use of firearms as well. While violent protests have occurred in major metropolitan areas, including downtown Cairo, Alexandria, and Port Said, the security situation in most tourist centers, including Luxor, Aswan, and Red Sea resorts such as Sharm el Sheikh, continues to be calm. Of specific concern is a rise in gender-based violence in and around protest areas where women have been the specific targets of sexual assault.

On June 28, a U.S. citizen was killed during a demonstration in Alexandria. On May 9, a private U.S. citizen was attacked with a knife outside of the U.S. Embassy after being asked whether he was an American.  Additionally, Westerners and U.S. citizens have occasionally been caught in the middle of clashes and demonstrations. U.S. citizens are urged to remain alert to local security developments and to be vigilant regarding their personal security by knowing the locations of police and fire stations, hospitals, and the U.S. Embassy.

If you wish to depart Egypt, you should make plans and depart as soon as possible. The airport is open and commercial flights are still operating, although cancellations may occur. Travelers should check with their airlines prior to their planned travel to verify the flight schedule. There are no plans for charter flights or other U.S. government-sponsored evacuations. U.S. citizens seeking to depart Egypt are responsible for making their own travel arrangements.

The U.S. Department of State strongly urges U.S. citizens to avoid all demonstrations in Egypt, as even peaceful ones can quickly become violent, and a foreigner could become a target of harassment or worse. Because of the proximity of the U.S. Embassy to Tahrir Square in Cairo, the U.S. Embassy has sometimes been closed to the public on short notice due to violent protests. The Embassy will notify U.S. citizens as quickly as possible of any closing and the types of emergency consular services that will be available. Should security forces block off the area around the U.S. Embassy during demonstrations, U.S. citizens should contact the American Citizens Services section before attempting to come to the U.S. Embassy during that time. U.S. citizens are urged to remain alert to local security developments and to carry identification and, if moving about alone, a cell phone or other means of communication that works in Egypt.

The U.S. Embassy restricts its employees and their family members from traveling to specific areas listed in the Country Specific Information Sheet and advises all U.S. citizens to do the same. We continue to urge U.S. citizens to stay current with media coverage of local events and be aware of their surroundings at all times. Please check our Country Specific Information Sheet for further security guidance.

Unless otherwise indicated in a public announcement, the U.S. Embassy is open for all routine American Citizens Services by appointment. U.S. citizens needing emergency assistance do not need an appointment. Visit the Embassy website to check the latest changes to Embassy hours or services. U.S. citizens with routine phone inquiries may call the Embassy's American Citizens Services section at 2797-2301, Sunday to Thursday from 9:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. For emergencies after business hours and on weekends and holidays, U.S. citizens can contact the Embassy Duty Officer via the Embassy switchboard on 2797-3300. The U.S. Embassy is closed on U.S. federal holidays. U.S. citizens in Egypt are encouraged to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). By enrolling, U.S. citizens make it easier for the Embassy to contact them in case of emergency.

For the latest security information, U.S. citizens traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State's Internet website at travel.state.gov where the Worldwide Caution, Country Specific Information for Egypt, Travel Warnings, and Travel Alerts can be found. Follow us on Twitter and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page on Facebook as well. Download our free Smart Traveler app, available through iTunes or Google Play, to have travel information at your fingertips.

Up-to-date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the United States and Canada, or, for callers outside the United States and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time,Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The U.S. Embassy in Egypt is located at 5 Tawfik Diab Street (formerly known as Latin America Street), Garden City, Cairo. For emergencies after business hours and on weekends and holidays, U.S. citizens can contact the Embassy Duty Officer via the Embassy switchboard on 2797-3300.

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Embassy of the United States Ankara, Turkey

Emergency Message For U.S. Citizens

Protests Throughout Turkey

June 3, 2013

The U.S. Embassy informs U.S. citizens that public demonstrations are taking place throughout Turkey at varying times and with little notice. Violent altercations have occurred in Ankara, Istanbul, Izmir, Adana, Mersin, and elsewhere. The continuing protests in Istanbul are centered on the Taksim and Besiktas areas, but others may occur elsewhere in the city as well. The Turkish National Police are clashing with protestors in some locations, and there have been numerous reports of injuries. Individuals caught in the vicinity of violence have been injured and detained. Visa services for non-U.S. citizens may be disrupted with little to no notice in the coming days. At least one labor union of public workers (KESK) has announced a planned strike for 1 ½ work days beginning at 12:00 noon on June 4. Please check our Embassy and Consulate websites for further details.

U.S. citizens traveling or residing in Turkey should be alert to the potential for violence. We strongly urge U.S. citizens to avoid demonstrations and large gatherings. Even demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence. Review your personal security plans, remain aware of your surroundings, including local events, and monitor local news stations for updates. Maintain a high level of vigilance, take appropriate steps to enhance your personal security, and follow instructions of local authorities.

We strongly recommend that U.S. citizens and nationals traveling to or residing in Turkey enroll in the State Department’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). U.S. citizens and nationals without Internet access may enroll directly with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. Enrolling signs you up to receive updated information about areas abroad and makes it easier for the U.S. embassy or consulate to communicate with you or your designated contact in case of emergency.

Current information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or a regular toll line at +1-202-501-4444 for callers from other countries. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

You can also stay up to date by bookmarking our Bureau of Consular Affairs website, which contains the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts as well as the Worldwide Caution. Follow us on Twitter and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page on Facebook as well. Download our free Smart Traveler App, available through iTunes and the Google Play market to have travel information at your fingertips.

Contact information for the U.S. Embassy and consulates in Turkey:

The U.S. Embassy in Ankara is located at 110 Ataturk Boulevard, tel: (90)(312) 455-5555, fax (90)(312) 468-6131.

The U.S. Consulate General in Istanbul is located at 2 Uçsehitler Sokak, 34460, Istinye, Sariyer, tel: (90) (212) 335-9000, fax (90) (212) 335-9102.

The U.S. Consulate in Adana is located at 212 Girne Bulvarı, Güzelevler Mahallesi, Yüreğir. tel: (90)(322) 346-6262, fax (90)(322) 346-7916.

The Consular Agency in Izmir can be reached at tel: (90) (232) 464-8755, fax (90) (232) 464-8916.

• This site is managed by the U.S. Department of State. External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

Travel Alert

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Bureau of Consular Affairs

Cameroon

May 31, 2013

The U.S. Embassy alerts U.S. citizens of the risks of travel to the Far North region of Cameroon and recommends against travel to this region, which includes the city of Maroua. In February 2013, Nigerian terrorists affiliated with Boko Haram kidnapped a French family travelling from Waza National Park in Cameroon and took them from Cameroon into Nigeria. The French family was released after being held captive for two months, but there is a continuing concern that expatriates could be targeted in the Far North region of Cameroon. This travel alert expires on August 26, 2013.

While we alert U.S. citizens against all travel to the Far North of Cameroon, we also urge extreme caution when travelling in the North region of Cameroon, especially in areas which border Nigeria. Nigeria recently declared a state of emergency in the states of Adamawa, Borno, and Yobe (Adamawa and Borno states in Nigeria share borders with the North and Far North regions of Cameroon). The Nigerian military has stepped up military operations against Boko Haram in these states. This could adversely affect security in neighboring regions of Cameroon should terrorists cross into Cameroon to avoid Nigerian military operations.

The U.S. Embassy has placed restrictions on travel by U.S. officials to the Far North of Cameroon; all U.S. officials must receive advance clearance from the U.S. Embassy to travel to the Far North, including the city of Maroua. You can stay in touch and get Embassy updates by checking the U.S. Embassy Yaounde web site (yaounde.usembassy.gov). You can also get global updates at the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs website where you can find the current Worldwide Caution, Travel Warnings, Travel Alerts, and Country Specific Information. If you don't have internet access, you may obtain up-to-date information on security conditions by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the United States and Canada, or from other countries on a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). You may also follow U.S. Embassy Yaounde’s Twitter feed for information for U.S. citizens at twitter.com/USEmbCameroon.

The U.S. Embassy in Yaounde encourages U.S. citizens to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (step.state.gov) for the most up-to-date security information. Keep all of your information in STEP up to date by maintaining your current phone numbers and email addresses where you can be reached in case of an emergency. U.S. citizens may also download our free Smart Traveler App from iTunes and the Google Play store to have travel information at their fingertips.

The U.S. Embassy in Yaoundé (yaounde.usembassy.gov) is located at Avenue Rosa Parks close to the Mont Febe Golf Club. The telephone number is 237 2220-1500 ext. 4341/4023. The number for after-hours emergencies is 237 2220-1500 ext. 4531. The fax number is 237 2220-1572. The Embassy’s e-mail address is yaoundeacs@state.gov.

This site is managed by the Bureau of Consular Affairs, U.S. Department of State. External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views contained therein.

Embassy of the United States Kinshasa, Congo

Travel Warning

By: U.S. Embassy Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo | Date: April 25, 2013

1. The Department of State warns U.S. citizens of the risks of traveling to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Congo-Kinshasa) (DRC).  The Department strongly recommends you avoid all travel to the city of Goma and the province of North Kivu, and all but essential travel to the province of South Kivu and the Ituri region in the province of Oriental.  Because of ongoing instability and violence, the Department's ability to provide consular services to U.S. citizens in these regions of the DRC is extremely limited. This replaces the Travel Warning dated November 21, 2012, to update information on security in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

2. Armed groups, bandits, and elements of the Congolese military remain security concerns in eastern and northeastern DRC.  These armed groups, primarily located in the North Kivu, South Kivu, and Orientale provinces, as well as the northern part of Katanga province, and the eastern part of Maniema province, are known to pillage, steal vehicles, kidnap, rape, kill, and carry out military or paramilitary operations in which civilians are indiscriminately targeted.  The Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) is present near the border with Uganda, Central African Republic, and the Republic of South Sudan.  The UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the DRC (MONUSCO) continues to assist the Congolese government with the protection of civilians and efforts to combat armed groups.

3. North and South Kivu have been the scene of violent clashes that have resulted in significant displacements of civilians since September 2010.  In April 2012, members of a rebel group that previously had been integrated into the Congolese military mutinied and heavy fighting has been reported in Massisi and Ruthshuru territories as well as in Virunga National Park.  In November 2012, members of this group captured several towns north of Goma and Goma itself, the provincial capital of North Kivu province.  Although the rebels withdrew from Goma in December 2012, the security and political situation in Goma and North Kivu remains tense and fragile.  In March 2013, there was fighting in North Kivu (although not in the city of Goma proper) between various factions of the rebel group that had previously captured Goma.  As a result, hundreds of people have been killed or injured, and tens of thousands more have been internally displaced.  Moreover, violence amongst foreign and Congolese rebel groups present in the northern part of North Kivu and former Rwandan militants in the southern part of the province and throughout South Kivu pose a serious and significant risk to travelers in the region.  This fighting underscores the persistent insecurity arising from activities of rebel and other armed groups operating in the Kivus, which contribute to the overall high risks and dangers associated with travel to eastern Congo.  The U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa currently does not allow travel by official personnel to North Kivu.  Travel to South Kivu and the Ituri region of Oriental province by Embassy personnel is permitted only under exceptional circumstances.

4. Travelers are frequently detained and questioned by poorly disciplined security forces at numerous official and unofficial roadblocks and border crossings throughout the country.  Requests for bribes in such instances are extremely common, and security forces have occasionally injured or killed people who refused to pay.  In the past year, several U.S. citizens were illegally detained by government forces, or were robbed of their valuables while being searched.  Very poor infrastructure (road and air) makes the provision of consular services difficult outside of Kinshasa.

5. The Embassy has received many reports of robberies and banditry in Goma after dark.  In most such cases, the robbers have stopped cars and stolen money and other valuables.  The poor condition of the roads, along with widespread new road construction around the city, contribute to the banditry problem, as traffic is either bottlenecked on the main road, or forced to travel on secondary roads with even worse conditions.  The Department strongly urges travelers who must go to Goma not to travel after dark.

6. Kinshasa has a critical crime threat level, and U.S. citizens continue to be the victims of serious crimes, including armed robbery by groups posing as law enforcement officials in both urban and rural areas, especially after nightfall.  Avoid walking alone and displaying cash and other personal property of value.  Avoid taking photos in public, especially of government buildings and the airport (which are viewed as places of national security), police stations, the presidential palace, border crossings, and along the river, since doing so may lead to arrest.

7. Lock vehicle doors and keep windows closed when driving.  You should not stop at the scene of an accident or at intersections where people have gathered, as mobs can develop quickly.  In areas where the roads are in poor condition and the speed limit is minimal, be wary of gangs of street children who may approach your car, open your door, and steal your belongings. Roadblocks are often found throughout the country, especially near government buildings and installations in Kinshasa, and should be avoided when possible. If stopped at a roadblock, keep doors locked and crack the window in order to communicate.

8. Official Congolese motorcades pose hazards to motorists and pedestrians.  Drivers should pull over to the far side of the road when sirens or security forces announce their presence.  You should not take photographs of motorcades.  Proceed only when security forces permit you to do so.

9. There is no reliable public transportation system in the DRC. Overcrowded vans and taxis, which often do not meet western safety standards, serve as public transportation in Kinshasa. Few independent taxis are available, operating largely out of the big hotels, and most do not meet safety standards.  You should avoid all travel by public transportation, and hire private transport from a reliable source.

10. The DRC has few viable roads or railways, but does have several major waterways.  Boat transport is widely used; however, the vessels are often overloaded and/or badly maintained, and accidents are commonplace and often fatal.

11. Public health concerns pose a hazard to U.S. citizen travelers due to outbreaks of deadly viruses and other diseases, which can occur without warning and often without swift reporting by local health authorities. Information on personal protection for international travelers, including children, can be found on the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) website

(http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/vaccinations.htm).  Travelers are required to carry evidence of yellow fever vaccination in order to enter the DRC. Health officials at entry points, such as the airport in Kinshasa, will check for proof of vaccination.  If you do not have evidence of a yellow fever vaccination, you may be denied entry or required to pay a fine.  Malaria (http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/vaccinations.htm) is common throughout the DRC and prophylaxis is recommended.  Please consult with your healthcare provider for more information and advice on prophylaxis.

12. Due to the recent outbreak of Wild Polio Virus and measles in the DRC, you should update your polio and measles vaccinations, if necessary, and refer to the CDC for additional guidance.  Due to the high levels of air borne irritants (i.e., dust, burning trash, debris, etc.) individuals with respiratory illnesses should carry all their necessary medications and equipment with adapters.

13. There is a high risk of traveler's diarrhea and cholera throughout the country.  This can be greatly reduced by using good judgment when choosing what food to eat and water to drink. When in restaurants, you should ask for bottled water and avoid ice.

14. Due to the immense size of the country, the density of the Congo River rainforest, the terrible state of the roads, and the poor security situation, the only way to get around the country quickly is by plane.  Domestic air travel on Congolese or other local airlines in the DRC is not recommended. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has assessed the government of the DRC as not being compliant with international standards for aviation safety oversight.  There have been several recent incidents causing deaths and injuries, including one on August 25, 2010, that killed all but one passenger.  In April 2011, a United Nations operated flight crashed while landing in Kinshasa, killing 32 passengers and crew. In July 2011, a Boeing 737 crashed in Kisangani, killing more than 70 passengers.  In March 2013, a domestic airline flight crashed in Goma, killing five crewmembers and passengers.  Crashes of private aircraft are even more common.  The U.S. Embassy has prohibited official travel by U.S. government employees and certain contractors on most airlines flying domestic routes in the DRC due to safety and maintenance concerns.  International flights on foreign-owned-and- operated carriers are not affected by this prohibition.

15. You should avoid all public demonstrations and areas where crowds have gathered because even peaceful events can become violent, and even deadly. You should exercise caution at all times, and closely monitor local and international news from reliable sources.  Radio Okapi broadcasts in French on 103.5 FM at 0700, 0800, 1200, and 1800 hours, and provides updates throughout the day. English-language news can be found on BBC at 92.6 FM.  In emergencies, the Belgian Embassy operates a French-language radio broadcast system at FM 98.8.  Changes in security conditions may occasionally restrict the travel of U.S. Mission personnel.

16. The U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa strongly encourages U.S. citizens who travel to or remain in the DRC despite this Travel Warning to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)( https://step.state.gov/step/) so you can receive the most up-to-date security information.  You should remember to keep all of your information in STEP current.  It is important to include your current phone number and email address where you can be reached in case of an emergency.

17. The U.S. Embassy is located at 310 Avenue des Aviateurs; the Consular Section entrance is located on Avenue Dumi, opposite Saint Anne's Church. The Embassy's telephone number, including for after- hours emergencies, is +243-81-556-0151; callers within the DRC should dial 081-556-0151.  All telephone lines in the DRC, cellular as well as landlines, are unreliable. Click here to visit the Embassy website ( http://kinshasa.usembassy.gov/ ).

18. For further information, consult the Department of State's Country Specific Information for Democratic Republic of the Congo ( http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1104.html )and the current Worldwide Caution ( http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/pa/pa_4787.html ), available on the Bureau of Consular Affairs Internet website ( http://travel.state.gov/ ).  Current information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll- free in the United States and Canada or, a regular toll line at-1-202-501-4444 for callers from other countries.  These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).  Stay up to date by bookmarking our Bureau of Consular Affairs website

( http://travel.state.gov/ ), which contains the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts ( http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis_pa_tw_1168.html ) as well as the Worldwide Caution (http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/pa/pa_4787.html ). Follow us on Twitter ( https://twitter.com/travelgov ) and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page on Facebook ( https://www.facebook.com/travelgov ) as well.  You can also download our free Smart Traveler App, available through iTunes ( https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/smart- traveler/id442693988?mt=8 ) and the Google Play store

( https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=gov.state.apps.sm artravel&hl=en ) to have travel information at your fingertips.

You can stay in touch and get Embassy updates by checking the U.S. Embassy Kinshasa web site.  You can also get global updates at the U.S. Department of State's, Bureau of Consular Affairs website where you can find the current Worldwide Caution, Travel Warning, Travel Alerts, and Country Specific Information.  Follow us on Twitter and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page on Facebook as well; or you can download our free Smart Traveler App from iTunes or the Android market to have travel information at your fingertips.  If you don't have internet access, you may obtain up-to-date information on security conditions by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada, or on a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444 from other countries.  These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).  

If you are going to live in or travel to the Democratic Republic of the Congo, please take the time to tell us about your trip by enrolling in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).  If you enroll, we can keep you up to date with important safety and security announcements.  It will also help your friends and family get in touch with you in an emergency.  You should remember to keep all of your information in STEP up to date.  It is important during enrollment or updating of information to include your current phone number and current email address where you can be reached in case of an emergency.

The U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa is located at 310 Avenue des Aviateurs, tel. +243-081-225-5872 (Do not dial the zero when calling from abroad).  The Consular Section of the Embassy may be reached at tel. +243-081-884-6859 or +243-081-884-4609 and is open Monday-Thursday, 7:30 a.m.-5:15 p.m. and Fridays from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

For after-hours emergencies, U.S. citizens should call 081-556-0151 and ask to speak with the duty officer.

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

Travel Warning

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Bureau of Consular Affairs

Pakistan

April 09, 2013

The Department of State warns U.S. citizens to defer all non-essential travel to Pakistan. This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning dated September 19, 2012, to remind U.S. citizens of ongoing security concerns in Pakistan.

The presence of several foreign and indigenous terrorist groups poses a potential danger to U.S. citizens throughout Pakistan. Across the country, terrorist attacks frequently occur against civilian, government, and foreign targets. Attacks have included armed assaults on heavily guarded sites, including Pakistani military installations. The Government of Pakistan maintains heightened security measures, particularly in the major cities. Threat reporting indicates terrorist groups continue to seek opportunities to attack locations where U.S. citizens and Westerners are known to congregate or visit. Terrorists and criminal groups regularly resort to kidnapping for ransom.

Protests against the United States are not uncommon and have the potential to turn violent. U.S. citizens in Pakistan are strongly advised to avoid all protests and large gatherings.

RECENT ATTACKS

There have been many terrorist attacks in recent years targeting civilians and security personnel. On March 3, 2013, a bomb attack in a predominately Shiite area of Karachi destroyed several buildings and killed over 50 people. In January and February 2013, two bomb attacks in Quetta targeted members of the Hazara community; each killed over 80 people. On September 3, 2012, unidentified terrorists attacked a U.S. government vehicle convoy in Peshawar, injuring U.S. and Pakistani personnel.On April 24, 2012, an explosion at the Lahore Railway Station killed three people and injured at least 30.

The Governor of the Punjab province and the Federal Minister for Minority Affairs were assassinated in Islamabad in January and March 2011, respectively. Targeted killings continue unabated in Karachi as a result of ethno-political rivalries. Targeted attacks against government officials, humanitarian and non-governmental organization (NGO) employees, tribal elders, and law enforcement personnel continue throughout the country, particularly in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan Provinces. Suicide bomb attacks have occurred at Islamabad universities, schools, rallies, places of worship, and major marketplaces in Lahore and Peshawar.

Members of minority communities have been victims of targeted killings and accusations of blasphemy, a crime that carries the death penalty in Pakistan. Foreign nationals, including U.S. citizens, on valid missionary visas have encountered increased scrutiny from local authorities since early 2011.

TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS FOR GOVERNMENT PERSONNEL

U.S. government personnel travel between the Embassy and Consulates might be restricted based on security or other reasons. Movements by U.S. government personnel assigned to the Consulates General are severely restricted, and consulate staff cannot drive personally-owned vehicles. Embassy staff are permitted to drive personally-owned vehicles in the greater Islamabad area.

U.S. officials in Islamabad are instructed to limit the frequency of travel and minimize the duration of trips to public markets, restaurants, and other locations. Only a limited number of official visitors are placed in hotels, and for limited stays. Depending on ongoing security assessments, the U.S. Mission sometimes places areas such as hotels, markets, and restaurants off limits to official personnel. Official U.S. citizens are not authorized to use public transportation and are sometimes asked to restrict the use of their personal vehicles in response to security concerns.

Access to many areas of Pakistan, including the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) along the Afghan border, the Swat Valley in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, and the area adjacent to the Line of Control (LOC) in the disputed territory of Kashmir, is restricted by local government authorities for non-Pakistanis. Travel to any restricted region requires official permission from the Government of Pakistan. Failure to obtain such permission in advance can result in arrest and detention by Pakistani authorities. Due to security concerns, the U.S. government currently allows only essential travel within the FATA by U.S. officials. Travel to much of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province and Balochistan is also restricted.

GENERAL SAFETY AND SECURITY

Since the announcement that Osama bin Laden was killed in Abbottabad, Pakistan on May 2, 2011, U.S. citizens should be aware of the possible increase in the threat level throughout the country.

Rallies, demonstrations, and processions occur regularly throughout Pakistan on very short notice. Demonstrations might take on an anti-U.S. or anti-Western character, and U.S. citizens are urged to avoid large gatherings. Anti-U.S. protests in September 2012 attracted large crowds outside U.S. diplomatic facilities in all major cities and caused casualties and significant property damage. The Mission reminds U.S. citizens that even peaceful demonstrations might become violent and advises U.S. citizens to avoid demonstrations. Given multiple demands for resources, local authorities may have limited capacity to respond to requests for assistance.

The Mission reiterates its advice to all U.S. citizens to maintain good situational awareness, avoid large crowds, and keep a low profile, particularly when visiting locations frequented by Westerners. U.S. citizens in Pakistan are strongly urged to avoid hotels that do not apply stringent security measures, and to vary times and routes for all travel.

U.S. citizens throughout Pakistan have also been kidnapped for ransom or for personal reasons such as family disputes over property. In August 2012, a U.S. citizen in Karachi was kidnapped from a car outside of a friend’s residence. In June 2011, a U.S. citizen in Lahore was kidnapped while en route to his business. Both U.S. citizens were released after their families paid a ransom. In August 2011, a U.S. citizen in Lahore was kidnapped from his residence. Al-Qaida later claimed responsibility and issued a list of demands in exchange for his release. The kidnapping of Pakistani citizens and other foreign nationals, usually for ransom, continues to increase nationwide. U.S. citizens who feel they are in danger or their security is at risk are strongly urged to depart Pakistan as soon as possible.

U.S. citizens seeking services from the U.S. Consulates General in Karachi and Peshawar might also encounter harassment from host government officials. Citing security concerns, host-government intelligence officials frequently stop U.S. citizens outside the Consulates and obtain their personal information before allowing them to proceed. U.S. citizens might later be visited at their homes or offices and questioned about the nature of their business in Pakistan and the purpose of their visit to the Consulate.

ENTRY/EXIT DIFFICULTIES

U.S. citizens should ensure that their travel documents and visas are valid at all times. U.S. citizens throughout Pakistan have been arrested, deported, harassed, and detained for overstaying their Pakistani visas or for traveling to Pakistan without the appropriate visa classification. U.S. citizens who attempt to renew or extend their visas while in Pakistan have been left without legal status for an extended period of time and subjected to harassment or interrogation by local authorities. The U.S. Embassy and Consulates General can provide very limited assistance to U.S. citizens who have overstayed their Pakistani visas. Since 2011, the number of U.S. citizens arrested, detained, and prosecuted for visa overstays has increased across the country.

U.S. citizens are advised to make electronic and paper copies of their U.S. passport, Pakistani visa, and entry stamp into Pakistan in order to facilitate their departure from Pakistan if their U.S. passport is lost or stolen, and keep the copies in a readily accessible location.

Security threats might, on short notice, temporarily restrict the ability of the U.S. Missions, particularly in Peshawar, to provide routine consular services. All U.S. citizens are encouraged to apply for renewal of travel documents at least three months prior to expiration.

U.S. citizens who travel to or remain in Pakistan despite this Travel Warning are encouraged to enroll with the Embassy in Islamabad or the Consulates General in Karachi, Lahore, or Peshawar. This enrollment can be completed online through the Department of State's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) available on the Department of Statewebsite. U.S. citizens without internet access should contact the nearest Embassy or Consulate General for information on registering in person. Enrollment enables citizens to obtain updated information on travel and security within Pakistan via the emergency alert system.

The U.S. Embassy in Islamabad is located at Diplomatic Enclave, Ramna 5, and can be reached by telephone at (92-51) 208-0000; Consular Section telephone (92-51) 208-2700; and fax (92-51) 282-2632.

The U.S. Consulate General in Karachi is located at Plot 3-5 New TPX Area, Mai Kolachi Road. U.S. citizens requiring emergency assistance should call the Consular Section in Karachi at (92-21) 3527-5000. The fax number is (92-21) 3561-2420.

The U.S. Consulate General in Lahore is located on 50 Sharah-E-Abdul Hamid Bin Badees (Old Empress Road), near Shimla Hill Rotary, and can be reached by telephone at (92-42) 3603-4000 and fax: (92-42) 3603- 4212.

The U.S. Consulate General in Peshawar is located at 11 Hospital Road, Cantonment, and can be reached by telephone at (92-91) 526-8800 and fax: (92-91) 528-4171.

Up-to-date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or, for callers outside the United States and Canada, on a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

For further information, U.S. citizens traveling abroad should consult the Department of State's Country Specific Information for Pakistan. Stay up to date by bookmarking our Bureau of Consular Affairs website, which contains the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts as well as the Worldwide Caution. Follow us on Twitter and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page on Facebook as well. You can also download our free Smart Traveler App, availablethrough iTunes or Google Play, to have travel information at your fingertips.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Bureau of Consular Affairs

Mali --  March 22, 2013

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens against all travel to Mali because of ongoing fighting in northern Mali, fluid political conditions, and continuing threats of attacks and kidnappings of westerners. While the security situation in Bamako remains relatively stable, there are ongoing security concerns and military operations taking place in the northern and western parts of the country. Mali continues to face challenges including food shortages, internally displaced persons, and the presence in northern Mali of factions linked to Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM). On March 19, the Department of State approved ordered departurefor school aged children. Eligible family members and non-school age children may depart Mali under authorized departure. This Travel Warning replaces the Travel Warning for Mali dated January 18, 2013.

Following a January 10 terrorist offensive and a January 11 military intervention by French forces, the Malian government banned all public demonstrations and, on January 11, Interim President Dioncounda Traore declared a State of Emergency in Mali, which went into effect on January 12. The state of emergency enables the government to take extraordinary measures to deal with the crisis in the north. As a result of safety and security concerns, some organizations, including foreign companies, NGOs, and private aid organizations, have temporarily suspended operations in Mali or withdrawn some family members and/or staff. The U.S. Embassy will continue to monitor this situation closely and update U.S. citizens via Emergency Messages which it will post on the Embassy’s website.

The Embassy has instructed embassy employees and their dependents to be cautious when traveling within Bamako. It encourages U.S. citizens to exercise caution, remain vigilant, maintain situational awareness at all times, and take appropriate security precautions to ensure personal safety. U.S. citizens throughout Mali should develop personal contingency plans, avoid all unnecessary travel, and travel on main roads. Malian security forces are regularly updating security safeguards, including checkpoints and other controls on movement in Bamako and around the country. 

The Government of Mali may periodically impose or lift curfews as security needs may dictate. U.S. citizens should be mindful of such potential measures, stay attuned to local news announcing such curfews, and comply with such locally imposed curfews. For internal safety and security reasons, the U.S. Embassy may also, without advance notice, periodically impose a temporary curfew on U.S. Embassy employees should the need arise. Whenever possible, such restrictions will be shared with the private U.S. citizen community and posted on the Embassy's website. U.S. citizens should carefully consider adopting similar safety measures by limiting any unnecessary travel or movements during such periods of heightened tension.

Elements of AQIM, Ansar al-Dine, the Movement for Oneness and Jihad in West Africa (MUJAO), and other groups continue to be present in northern Mali, although they have been mostly dislodged from major population centers, including Gao and Kidal. On November 20, 2012, a French citizen was kidnapped by MUJAO from Diema, Koulikoro Region, and terrorist groups have stepped up their rhetoric calling for additional attacks or kidnapping attempts on westerners, particularly those linked to support for international military intervention.

U.S. citizens should also note that the Embassy has forbidden all travel by U.S. government employees and their dependents to regions north of the city of Mopti. This designation is based on insecurity in areas adjacent to this area, including the presence of AQIM and the threat of kidnapping, as well as banditry in the region. U.S. citizens planning to travel to Mali, particularly to destinations outside of Bamako, should consult the Embassy or your host organization(s) for the most recent security assessment of the areas where you plan to travel.

Senou International Airport in Bamako is open for business and scheduled flights are proceeding normally. Some international flights have occasionally been canceled due to low travel volume, but travelers have been notified in advance. Persons wishing to depart the country should check with commercial airlines for the airport's operational status, and flight and seat availability, before traveling to the airport.

In this period of heightened tension, the U.S. Embassy reminds all U.S. citizens of the risk of terrorist activity in Mali, including in Bamako. U.S. citizens are urged to exercise caution, to be particularly alert to their surroundings, and to avoid crowds, demonstrations, or any other form of public gathering. U.S. citizens are further encouraged to exercise prudence if choosing to visit locations frequented by westerners in and around Bamako. 

The U.S. Embassy may close temporarily for non-emergency business from time to time to review its security posture. U.S. citizens currently in Mali, despite this Travel Warning, should enroll in the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP). By enrolling, the Embassy can contact you more easily in case of emergency.

  U.S. citizens should consult the Country Specific Information for Mali and the Worldwide Caution, both located on the Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs website. Current information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada, or a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444 from other countries. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

Stay up to date by bookmarking our Bureau of Consular Affairs website, which contains the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts as well as the Worldwide Caution. Follow us on Twitter and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page on Facebook as well. You can also download our free Smart Traveler App, available through iTunes and the Android market, to have travel information at your fingertips.

The U.S. Embassy in Bamako is located in ACI 2000 at Rue 243, Porte 297. The Embassy's mailing address is B.P. 34, Bamako, Mali. The telephone number, including for after-hour emergencies, is 223 2070-2300. The consular fax number is 223 2070-2340

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  • March 11, 2013:  Travel Warning
  • U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
  • Bureau of Consular Affairs
  • Libya
  • The Department of State warns U.S. citizens of the risks of traveling to Libya and strongly advises against all but essential travel to Tripoli and all travel to Benghazi, Bani Walid, and southern Libya, including border areas and the regions of Sabha and Kufra. Because of ongoing instability and violence, the Department’s ability to provide consular services to U.S. citizens in these regions of Libya is extremely limited. This Travel Warning supersedes the Travel Warning dated January 4, 2013.
  • As of March 10, the U.S. Embassy in Libya is no longer on ordered departure status but remains an unaccompanied post due to security concerns. On September 12, 2012, the Department of State ordered the departure of all non-emergency U.S. government personnel from Libya following the attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi. The security situation in Libya remains unpredictable. Sporadic episodes of civil unrest have occurred throughout the country.U.S. citizens should avoid areas of demonstrations and exercise caution if in the vicinity of any large gatherings, protests, or demonstrations, as even demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence. U.S. citizens traveling to, or remaining in, Libya should use caution and limit nonessential travel within the country, make their own contingency emergency plans, and maintain security awareness at all times.
  • We strongly recommend that U.S. citizens traveling to or residing in Libya enroll in the Department of State's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)<http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/registration/registration_4789.html>, STEP enrollment gives you the latest security updates and makes it easier for the U.S. embassy or nearest U.S. consulate to contact you in an emergency. If you don't have internet access, enroll directly with the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.
  • The Embassy’s website<http://libya.usembassy.gov/>, includes consular information and the most recent messages for U.S. citizens<http://libya.usembassy.gov/service/information-for-travelers/warden-messages.html> in Libya<http://www.travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_951.html>. U.S. citizens in need of emergency assistance should call 091-379-4560 within Libya or 218-91-379-4560 if dialing from outside of Libya.
  • For information on “What the Department of State Can and Can't Do in a Crisis,” please visit the Bureau of Consular Affairs’ Emergencies and Crisis link<http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/emergencies/emergencies_1212.html>. Up-to-date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada or, for callers outside the United States and Canada, on a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • For further information, U.S. citizens should consult the Department of State’s Country Specific Information for Libya<http://www.travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_951.html>. Stay up to date by bookmarking our Bureau of Consular Affairs website<http://travel.state.gov/>,which contains the current Travel Warnings<http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/tw/tw_1764.html> and Travel Alerts<http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/pa/pa_1766.html> as well as the Worldwide Caution<http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/pa/pa_4787.html>. Follow us on Twitter<http://twitter.com/#!/TravelGov> and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page on Facebook<http://www.facebook.com/travelgov> as well. You can also download our free Smart Traveler App, available through iTunes<http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/smart-traveler/id442693988?mt=8> and the Android market<https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=gov.state.apps.smartravel&hl=en>, to have travel information at your fingertips.
  • •         Privacy<http://www.state.gov/misc/415.htm>
  • •         Copyright & Disclaimer<http://travel.state.gov/about/about_4955.html>
  • •         FOIA<http://www.state.gov/m/a/ips/>
  • •         Office of the Inspector General<http://oig.state.gov/>
  • •         No Fear Act Data<http://www.state.gov/s/ocr/c11528.htm>
  • •         U.S. Department of State<http://www.state.gov/>
  • •         Other U.S. Government Information<http://travel.state.gov/visa/immigrants/info/info_1332.html>
  • This site is managed by the Bureau of Consular Affairs, U.S. Department of State. External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as a an

Comments

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General Information

SEVP Launches Mobile-Friendly FMJfee.com Website

All F and M nonimmigrant students and J-1 exchange visitors must pay the I-901 SEVIS fee on FMJfee.com prior to applying for a visa to study in the United States. To make the process easier, FMJfee.com is now accessible on mobile devices.

Users can now login to the site on any mobile device to:

·         Find recent news and updates related to the I-901 SEVIS fee;

·         Check an I-901 SEVIS fee payment status;

·         View and save a I-901 payment confirmation so you can print it later;

·         Read answers to frequently asked questions; and

·         Visit Study in the States and associated social media platforms.

Those who have paid the fee must print a copy of the I-901 SEVIS fee payment confirmation to take with them when applying for a visa to enter the United States. Showing a copy of it from a mobile device will not be accepted. Stay tuned for additional updates and enhancements to the mobile site, including mobile I-901 SEVIS fee payment capabilities.

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he Broadcast Message is not a substitute for applicable legal requirements, nor is it itself a rule or a final action by SEVP. It is not intended to, does not, and may not be relied upon to create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by any party in any administrative, civil, or criminal matter.

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All content, materials, information and images (collectively “content”) within this site may be protected by U.S. copyright laws and may not be copied or republished without the express written permission of their respective owners. All rights are reserved by the original owners. All content is available for informational and noncommercial uses only. NJIT is offering the content strictly as a public service and can make no guarantee as to the accuracy or suitability for a given purpose of any of the content or third party services or programs mentioned on this site. All content is provided on an “as is” basis with no warranties of any kind, and all users bear all risks associated with using the same.

Although NJIT may include links providing direct access to other Internet resources, NJIT is not responsible for the accuracy of the content contained in these sites. Links from NJIT to third party services do not constitute an endorsement by NJIT of their products or services and NJIT has not investigated the same. Any transactions that you enter into with a third party mentioned on or linked to this site is solely between you and the other party. NJIT is not responsible for any such third party or its content that may be accessed via this site. NJIT does not endorse the content contained in these sites, nor the organizations publishing those sites, and hereby disclaims any responsibility for the same.